My Little Spy Radio

Ever since my time at high school, certain aspects of WW2 fascinated me. Allied tactics, Clandestine activities, Special projects,  Axis plots, Conspiracies, Spy activities, and even number stations always peaked my interest. I had a genuine desire to learn as much as I could about that era of time.

Don’t call me a Nazi, just because I mentioned a genocidal time frame, its just hard to fathom what happened during that time and so much pain that was caused.  My tribute to that entire era, the men and women who perished to rid this world of an imaginable evil and my fascinations is my home built replica paraset radio from 4 States QRP.

Construction:

I took up kit building after a short stint without a HF Radio (Talk about being board out of my mind!). I had purchased a kit from my club’s hamfest, it was a CW Pixie 40M Rig. Although that build went quite normal and very neatly, I could not wait to get it on the air.  My happiness shortly ran out when I had brought that “Chinglish,” abomination on ham radio frequencies. It was a horrible mess and such a dirty receiver!  Bandwith was just horrible and no controls were present to adjust any bandwidth what so ever.  If I shorted out this radio’s TX crystal, I could pick up 570kHz (570WSYR)!  I did not manage to make any meaningful QSO’s on that pile of scrap, and it was vacated from my shack.  This was a big confidence booster though and I decided to tackle another kit, this time a much larger scale project. This is when I found 4 State’s QRP Bayou Jumper.  I ordered it promptly as well as the filtering board and relished in it’s glory when it arrived!.

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I think it was that following Saturday sometime in August of 2017 I put that rig together. it was a 12 hour affair straight through (9AM – 9PM) just for the rig. I managed to get every solder joint and component soldered in perfectly.  I knew then I had one thing left to fight with.

That damn toroid.

Winding instructions provided by 4SQRP were awesome and laid everything out cold.  I did not know if enamel coating on those toroidal windings needed to be stripped off. So I left it on.  I found the hard way that enamel needed to be stripped off and had to un-solder that toroid in order to get that crap off.  Likely continuity tests came out positive after I was finished re-soldering in that yellow donut again.

the next day I got 4sQRP filter board all soldered together and wired up into my paraset radio.  Having that board installed made such a difference on receive. My paraset had so much more filtering capability that I could almost notch out noise and other stations with ease. a highly recommended component add on to this rig.

Once it was together, another few testing cycles and off it went into a box.  However, I really did not have any box I could use. Hobby Lobby boxes were to large and chinsy to use for this rig. Chinese crap did not do it justice.  I enlisted the help of a fellow friend and wood working guru, Jeryl Wright N2KC. The box you see above you is his cherished work. This box characterizes an essence to this radio and where it belongs!

Operational Characteristics:

I found this radio to be on an equal rung or even better sensitivity than my KX3. Being a regenerative receiver I thought it would just feedback on itself and cause quite a blithering mess.  It is a very pleasant hiss to listen to. Static rejection was great when filtering was kicked in.  It did take some time to get use to it.

Alignment was pretty tough. I had to figure out my RX bandwidth and then see how far I could hear. So far, I believe i am tuned down below the CW portion of 40M up somewhere around 7150kc.  I will need another experienced ham to assist me with a tone generator to see where about’s this thing really is and if alignment is truly correct.

I do have a bit of a quack when I switch on the filtering and from TX to RX, but I just need to not flick that switch!

Here is an operating video(click here to “Watch on Facebook”).

Conclusion:

It is a great radio!

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